Black Soldier Fly (BSF) meal is considered an alternative, emerging, and sustainable ingredient for aquafeed formulation. However, results on fish physiological responses are still fragmentary and often controversial, and no data are available on the effect of insect meal-based diets on fish reproduction. On this regard, zebrafish, with its relatively short life cycle, represents an ideal experimental model to explore this topic. In this study, female zebrafish were fed for 12 months on a control diet based on fish meal (FM) and fish oil and two experimental diets with full-fat BSF (Hermetia illucens) prepupae meal inclusion, to replace 25% and 50% of FM (BSF25 and BSF50). All diets were isonitrogenous, isolipidic, and isoenergetic. The effects of these two experimental diets on female's reproduction were investigated through a multidisciplinary approach, including the evaluation of growth, gonadosomatic index, spawned/fertilized eggs and hatching rate, adult female carcass and fertilized egg fatty acid composition, histological analysis of the ovary, spectroscopic macromolecular composition of class IV oocytes, and expression of genes involved in fish lipid metabolism in the liver. Results showed that while fish were perfectly able to cope with a 25% insect meal dietary inclusion, a 50% inclusion level caused the overexpression of genes involved in lipid metabolism, a general reduction in the number of spawned eggs, and differences in the frequency rate of previtellogenic oocytes, class III, IV, oocytes and postovulatory follicles and atretic oocytes, in the macromolecular composition of class IV oocytes, and in the fatty acid composition of the fertilized eggs, respect to control and 25% group.

Can Insect-Based Diets Affect Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Reproduction? A Multidisciplinary Study

Cardinaletti, Gloriana;
2020

Abstract

Black Soldier Fly (BSF) meal is considered an alternative, emerging, and sustainable ingredient for aquafeed formulation. However, results on fish physiological responses are still fragmentary and often controversial, and no data are available on the effect of insect meal-based diets on fish reproduction. On this regard, zebrafish, with its relatively short life cycle, represents an ideal experimental model to explore this topic. In this study, female zebrafish were fed for 12 months on a control diet based on fish meal (FM) and fish oil and two experimental diets with full-fat BSF (Hermetia illucens) prepupae meal inclusion, to replace 25% and 50% of FM (BSF25 and BSF50). All diets were isonitrogenous, isolipidic, and isoenergetic. The effects of these two experimental diets on female's reproduction were investigated through a multidisciplinary approach, including the evaluation of growth, gonadosomatic index, spawned/fertilized eggs and hatching rate, adult female carcass and fertilized egg fatty acid composition, histological analysis of the ovary, spectroscopic macromolecular composition of class IV oocytes, and expression of genes involved in fish lipid metabolism in the liver. Results showed that while fish were perfectly able to cope with a 25% insect meal dietary inclusion, a 50% inclusion level caused the overexpression of genes involved in lipid metabolism, a general reduction in the number of spawned eggs, and differences in the frequency rate of previtellogenic oocytes, class III, IV, oocytes and postovulatory follicles and atretic oocytes, in the macromolecular composition of class IV oocytes, and in the fatty acid composition of the fertilized eggs, respect to control and 25% group.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/1189513
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