Data regarding the possible relationship of insomnia and EDS with mortality are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between these sleep complaints and the risk of long-term (20 years) all-cause mortality in older adults. Between April 2000 and March 2001, 750 subjects aged 65 years and older, who resided in the seventh district of Udine, were recruited. Data on sociodemographic characteristics, past medical history, and pharmacological treatment were collected. Dementia was diagnosed using a comprehensive neurological and neuroradiological assessment. Older adults were interviewed by neuropsychologists trained in sleep disturbances in order to assess the presence of sleep complaints. Vital status was followed over 20 years until March 2020. Older male adults affected by insomnia and EDS were significantly more likely to die over the follow-up period. Indeed, males reporting poor sleep and daytime somnolence had a 60% and 48% higher chance of dying than subjects who were not affected by these sleep complaints, respectively. The HR was attenuated after adjusting for confounding variables among insomniacs, whereas that of somnolent men strengthened. Differently from men, insomnia and EDS did not have any impact on mortality in older women. In conclusion, older male adults affected by insomnia and EDS had a significant increased risk of mortality, which is independent of cancer, depression, dementia, cardiovascular diseases, and sleeping pill use.

Insomnia and daytime sleepiness predict 20-year mortality in older male adults: data from a population-based study

Gigli G. L.;Del Negro I.;Tereshko Y.;Smeralda C.;Valente M.
2020-01-01

Abstract

Data regarding the possible relationship of insomnia and EDS with mortality are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between these sleep complaints and the risk of long-term (20 years) all-cause mortality in older adults. Between April 2000 and March 2001, 750 subjects aged 65 years and older, who resided in the seventh district of Udine, were recruited. Data on sociodemographic characteristics, past medical history, and pharmacological treatment were collected. Dementia was diagnosed using a comprehensive neurological and neuroradiological assessment. Older adults were interviewed by neuropsychologists trained in sleep disturbances in order to assess the presence of sleep complaints. Vital status was followed over 20 years until March 2020. Older male adults affected by insomnia and EDS were significantly more likely to die over the follow-up period. Indeed, males reporting poor sleep and daytime somnolence had a 60% and 48% higher chance of dying than subjects who were not affected by these sleep complaints, respectively. The HR was attenuated after adjusting for confounding variables among insomniacs, whereas that of somnolent men strengthened. Differently from men, insomnia and EDS did not have any impact on mortality in older women. In conclusion, older male adults affected by insomnia and EDS had a significant increased risk of mortality, which is independent of cancer, depression, dementia, cardiovascular diseases, and sleeping pill use.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11390/1195865
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