Despite a growing interest in microalgae and cyanobacteria as potential sources of nutrients in aquafeeds, little information is presently available on their nutritive value for carnivorous fish species. The aim of this study was to evaluate chemical composition and nutrient digestibility of a panel of microalgae and cyanobacteria dried biomasses (MACB), using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss W.) as a fish model. Nine test diets were obtained by mixing 80 parts of a reference diet, added with 20 g/kg of acid insoluble ash as an indigestible marker, to 20 parts of each of the following dried whole-cell biomass: Arthrospira platensis, Nostoc sphaeroides, two strains of Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis oceanica, Tisochrysis lutea, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Porphyridium purpureum and Tetraselmis suecica. The digestibility measurements were conducted with rainbow trout (52.4 ± 1.5 g) kept in six tank units each including three 60-L vessels singularly stocked with 12 fish and fitted with a settling column for faecal recovery. Per each diet, faeces were collected over three independent 10-day periods. Apparent digestibility coefficients (ADCs) of dry matter, crude protein (CP), organic matter and gross energy (GE) of single MACB were calculated by difference relative to those of the reference diet. The MACBs had heterogeneous chemical composition (CP, from 20 to 69%; Lipid, 5–27%; GE, 12.5-–22.6 MJ/kg dry matter basis) reflecting their overall biodiversity. Most of them can be considered as virtually good sources of minerals and trace elements and exhibit an essential amino acid profile comparable or even better than that of soybean meal commonly used in fish feeds with P. purpureum showing the best protein profile. The digestibility results obtained with rainbow trout allowed ranking the MACBs into two major groups. A first one, including C. sorokiniana, N. oceanica and T. suecica, resulted in markedly lower (P < 0.05) crude protein and energy ADC (64–73%; 51–59%, respectively) compared to a second group including P. purpureum, T. lutea and cyanobacteria (CP-ADC, 83–88%; GE-ADC, 74–90%) while P. tricornutum resulted in intermediate values. Overall, the present study confirms the consistently reported role of cell-wall structure/composition in affecting accessibility of nutrients to digestive enzyme. Based on the overall outcomes, only T. lutea and cyanobacteria actually meet the requirements for being used as protein sources in aquafeeds provided their mass production becomes more feasible and costeffective, hence attractive for the feed-mill industry in the near future.

Chemical composition and apparent digestibility of a panel of dried microalgae and cyanobacteria biomasses in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Cerri, R.;Cardinaletti, G.
;
Tulli, F.;Mina, F.;Daniso, E.;Tibaldi, E.
2021

Abstract

Despite a growing interest in microalgae and cyanobacteria as potential sources of nutrients in aquafeeds, little information is presently available on their nutritive value for carnivorous fish species. The aim of this study was to evaluate chemical composition and nutrient digestibility of a panel of microalgae and cyanobacteria dried biomasses (MACB), using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss W.) as a fish model. Nine test diets were obtained by mixing 80 parts of a reference diet, added with 20 g/kg of acid insoluble ash as an indigestible marker, to 20 parts of each of the following dried whole-cell biomass: Arthrospira platensis, Nostoc sphaeroides, two strains of Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis oceanica, Tisochrysis lutea, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Porphyridium purpureum and Tetraselmis suecica. The digestibility measurements were conducted with rainbow trout (52.4 ± 1.5 g) kept in six tank units each including three 60-L vessels singularly stocked with 12 fish and fitted with a settling column for faecal recovery. Per each diet, faeces were collected over three independent 10-day periods. Apparent digestibility coefficients (ADCs) of dry matter, crude protein (CP), organic matter and gross energy (GE) of single MACB were calculated by difference relative to those of the reference diet. The MACBs had heterogeneous chemical composition (CP, from 20 to 69%; Lipid, 5–27%; GE, 12.5-–22.6 MJ/kg dry matter basis) reflecting their overall biodiversity. Most of them can be considered as virtually good sources of minerals and trace elements and exhibit an essential amino acid profile comparable or even better than that of soybean meal commonly used in fish feeds with P. purpureum showing the best protein profile. The digestibility results obtained with rainbow trout allowed ranking the MACBs into two major groups. A first one, including C. sorokiniana, N. oceanica and T. suecica, resulted in markedly lower (P < 0.05) crude protein and energy ADC (64–73%; 51–59%, respectively) compared to a second group including P. purpureum, T. lutea and cyanobacteria (CP-ADC, 83–88%; GE-ADC, 74–90%) while P. tricornutum resulted in intermediate values. Overall, the present study confirms the consistently reported role of cell-wall structure/composition in affecting accessibility of nutrients to digestive enzyme. Based on the overall outcomes, only T. lutea and cyanobacteria actually meet the requirements for being used as protein sources in aquafeeds provided their mass production becomes more feasible and costeffective, hence attractive for the feed-mill industry in the near future.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Aquaculture_2021_digestibility microalgae.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Versione Editoriale (PDF)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 468.43 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
468.43 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/1207444
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 4
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 3
social impact