Background: Ischemic type biliary lesions (ITBLs), a particular subset of non-anastomotic biliary strictures (NAS), are characterized by intra and extrahepatic strictures that occur in the absence of either hepatic artery thrombosis or stenosis. When they occur within the first year after liver transplantation their development is mostly related to ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). The indocyanine green plasma disappearance rate (ICG-PDR) might be able to predict the probability of IRI-induced graft damage after liver transplantation. Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the association between ICG-PDR and the occurrence of ITBLs. Secondly, we searched for evidence of IRI in patients presenting ITBLs. Methods: This retrospective single-center observational study assessed a cohort of 60 liver transplant patients. Each patient underwent ICG-PDR on the 1st postoperative day. ITBLs were identified by means of either cholangiography or magnetic resonance imaging evidence of a deformity and narrowing of the biliary tree in the absence of hepatic artery thrombosis/stenosis. Results: ITBLs were discovered in 10 patients out of 60 liver recipients (16.67%) within one year after transplantation. A low ICG-PDR value was found to be a significant predictive factor for ITBL development, with an OR of 0.87 and a 95% CI of 0.77–0.97. Liver biopsies were performed in 56 patients presenting unexplained abnormal liver function test results. A statistically significant association was found between the development of ITBLs and anatomopathological evidence of IRI. Limitations: Retrospective, single-center study. Conclusions: The findings from this study show a relationship between low ICG-PDR values on first post-operative-day and the occurrence of ITBLs within 1 year after transplantation.

Association between indocyanine green clearance test and ischemic type biliary lesions within one year after orthotopic liver transplantation

Vetrugno L.;Zanini V.;Clocchiatti L.;Boscolo E.;Di Loreto C.;Bove T.;Terrosu G.;Risaliti A.;Baccarani U.
2021

Abstract

Background: Ischemic type biliary lesions (ITBLs), a particular subset of non-anastomotic biliary strictures (NAS), are characterized by intra and extrahepatic strictures that occur in the absence of either hepatic artery thrombosis or stenosis. When they occur within the first year after liver transplantation their development is mostly related to ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). The indocyanine green plasma disappearance rate (ICG-PDR) might be able to predict the probability of IRI-induced graft damage after liver transplantation. Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the association between ICG-PDR and the occurrence of ITBLs. Secondly, we searched for evidence of IRI in patients presenting ITBLs. Methods: This retrospective single-center observational study assessed a cohort of 60 liver transplant patients. Each patient underwent ICG-PDR on the 1st postoperative day. ITBLs were identified by means of either cholangiography or magnetic resonance imaging evidence of a deformity and narrowing of the biliary tree in the absence of hepatic artery thrombosis/stenosis. Results: ITBLs were discovered in 10 patients out of 60 liver recipients (16.67%) within one year after transplantation. A low ICG-PDR value was found to be a significant predictive factor for ITBL development, with an OR of 0.87 and a 95% CI of 0.77–0.97. Liver biopsies were performed in 56 patients presenting unexplained abnormal liver function test results. A statistically significant association was found between the development of ITBLs and anatomopathological evidence of IRI. Limitations: Retrospective, single-center study. Conclusions: The findings from this study show a relationship between low ICG-PDR values on first post-operative-day and the occurrence of ITBLs within 1 year after transplantation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/1207922
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