The inhibitory effect of extracellular DNA (exDNA) on the growth of conspecific individuals was demonstrated in different kingdoms. In plants, the inhibition has been observed on root growth and seed germination, demonstrating its role in plant–soil negative feedback. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the early response to exDNA and the inhibitory effect of conspecific exDNA. We here contribute with a whole-plant transcriptome profiling in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to extracellular self-(conspecific) and nonself-(heterologous) DNA. The results highlight that cells distinguish self-from nonself-DNA. Moreover, confocal microscopy analyses reveal that nonself-DNA enters root tissues and cells, while self-DNA remains outside. Specifically, exposure to self-DNA limits cell permeability, affecting chloroplast functioning and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, eventually causing cell cycle arrest, consistently with macroscopic observations of root apex necrosis, increased root hair density and leaf chlorosis. In contrast, nonself-DNA enters the cells triggering the activation of a hypersensitive response and evolving into systemic acquired resistance. Complex and different cascades of events emerge from exposure to extracellular selfor nonself-DNA and are discussed in the context of Damage-and Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMP and PAMP, respectively) responses.

Arabidopsis thaliana response to extracellular dna: Self versus nonself exposure

Incerti G.;
2021

Abstract

The inhibitory effect of extracellular DNA (exDNA) on the growth of conspecific individuals was demonstrated in different kingdoms. In plants, the inhibition has been observed on root growth and seed germination, demonstrating its role in plant–soil negative feedback. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the early response to exDNA and the inhibitory effect of conspecific exDNA. We here contribute with a whole-plant transcriptome profiling in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to extracellular self-(conspecific) and nonself-(heterologous) DNA. The results highlight that cells distinguish self-from nonself-DNA. Moreover, confocal microscopy analyses reveal that nonself-DNA enters root tissues and cells, while self-DNA remains outside. Specifically, exposure to self-DNA limits cell permeability, affecting chloroplast functioning and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, eventually causing cell cycle arrest, consistently with macroscopic observations of root apex necrosis, increased root hair density and leaf chlorosis. In contrast, nonself-DNA enters the cells triggering the activation of a hypersensitive response and evolving into systemic acquired resistance. Complex and different cascades of events emerge from exposure to extracellular selfor nonself-DNA and are discussed in the context of Damage-and Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMP and PAMP, respectively) responses.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/1210267
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