Purpose: Blindness and vision loss are still frequent disabilities associated with a relevant impact on health care and quality of life, and a high economic burden. Supranational programs established by the World Health Organization (WHO), International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB), and World Health Assembly (WHA) aim at reducing avoidable visual impairment. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy (DR), and other retinal diseases are well known causes of visual disability. Since more than a decade, intravitreal agents are available for the treatment of these diseases. The aim of this study is to review whether pharmacotherapy with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs has led to a decrease in the prevalence of blindness with emphasis on AMD and different countries. A brief analysis of other factors correlated to changes in the rate of blindness is also presented. Methods: PubMed and Scopus web platforms were used to identify relevant studies on epidemiology of blindness and vision impairment, the influence of intravitreal therapies, and the existence of different vision care models. Additional data and material was searched in web internet accessed by the web browser Firefox. Results: Age-standardized prevalence of blindness secondary to AMD has started to decline as testified by a number of studies in different countries. This is due to the adoption of anti-VEGF therapy and its adequate management. The frequency of treatment and regimens applied are indirect signs of successful treatment. Local rules and regulations may represent an obstacle. Conclusions: This review shows that by implementing existing health care systems and dispensing adequate therapies in the field of retinal diseases, the prevalence of blindness due to these conditions can decline. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

Anti-VEGF therapies for age-related macular degeneration: a powerful tactical gear or a blunt weapon? The choice is ours

Lanzetta P.
2021

Abstract

Purpose: Blindness and vision loss are still frequent disabilities associated with a relevant impact on health care and quality of life, and a high economic burden. Supranational programs established by the World Health Organization (WHO), International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB), and World Health Assembly (WHA) aim at reducing avoidable visual impairment. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy (DR), and other retinal diseases are well known causes of visual disability. Since more than a decade, intravitreal agents are available for the treatment of these diseases. The aim of this study is to review whether pharmacotherapy with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs has led to a decrease in the prevalence of blindness with emphasis on AMD and different countries. A brief analysis of other factors correlated to changes in the rate of blindness is also presented. Methods: PubMed and Scopus web platforms were used to identify relevant studies on epidemiology of blindness and vision impairment, the influence of intravitreal therapies, and the existence of different vision care models. Additional data and material was searched in web internet accessed by the web browser Firefox. Results: Age-standardized prevalence of blindness secondary to AMD has started to decline as testified by a number of studies in different countries. This is due to the adoption of anti-VEGF therapy and its adequate management. The frequency of treatment and regimens applied are indirect signs of successful treatment. Local rules and regulations may represent an obstacle. Conclusions: This review shows that by implementing existing health care systems and dispensing adequate therapies in the field of retinal diseases, the prevalence of blindness due to these conditions can decline. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/1213904
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