Objective: High grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) is the most common type of malignant ovarian neoplasm and the main cause of ovarian cancer related deaths worldwide. Although novel biomarkers such as homologous recombination deficiency testing have been implemented into the clinical decision-making algorithm since diagnosis, morphological classification and immunohistochemistry analysis are essential for diagnostic purpose. This study aims at identifying histologic and clinical features that can be predictive of patients' prognosis. Methods: Morphological and architectural characterization including SET (Solid-Endometroid-Transitional)/Classic features was carried out in a cohort of 234 patients analyzing 695 slides. From each slide tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TILs), the presence of necrosis, the number of mitoses, the presence of psammoma bodies, giant cells and atypical mitoses were recorded. Morphological heterogeneity was quantified by the Shannon's diversity index (SDI) considering the percentage of each architectural pattern per patient's slide. Results: The frequency of architectural patterns and morphological variables varied with respect of the surgical strategy (primary debulking surgery vs interval surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy). HGSOCs exhibiting SET features had a longer overall as well as progression free survival. Among SET features, pseudo-endometrioid and transitional like patterns had the best outcome, while it was heterogenous for solid pattern, that had better outcome for BRCA 1 negative and less heterogeneous tumors. In patients submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy a higher intratumor heterogeneity as defined by SDI was a negative independent prognostic factor. Conclusions: A comprehensive histological examination considering architectural patterns and their heterogeneity can help in prognostication of HGSOCs.

Histological patterns and intra-tumor heterogeneity as prognostication tools in high grade serous ovarian cancers

Puglisi F.;
2021

Abstract

Objective: High grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) is the most common type of malignant ovarian neoplasm and the main cause of ovarian cancer related deaths worldwide. Although novel biomarkers such as homologous recombination deficiency testing have been implemented into the clinical decision-making algorithm since diagnosis, morphological classification and immunohistochemistry analysis are essential for diagnostic purpose. This study aims at identifying histologic and clinical features that can be predictive of patients' prognosis. Methods: Morphological and architectural characterization including SET (Solid-Endometroid-Transitional)/Classic features was carried out in a cohort of 234 patients analyzing 695 slides. From each slide tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TILs), the presence of necrosis, the number of mitoses, the presence of psammoma bodies, giant cells and atypical mitoses were recorded. Morphological heterogeneity was quantified by the Shannon's diversity index (SDI) considering the percentage of each architectural pattern per patient's slide. Results: The frequency of architectural patterns and morphological variables varied with respect of the surgical strategy (primary debulking surgery vs interval surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy). HGSOCs exhibiting SET features had a longer overall as well as progression free survival. Among SET features, pseudo-endometrioid and transitional like patterns had the best outcome, while it was heterogenous for solid pattern, that had better outcome for BRCA 1 negative and less heterogeneous tumors. In patients submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy a higher intratumor heterogeneity as defined by SDI was a negative independent prognostic factor. Conclusions: A comprehensive histological examination considering architectural patterns and their heterogeneity can help in prognostication of HGSOCs.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/1213952
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