Infertility is a highly relevant global issue affecting the reproductive health of at least 15% of reproductive-aged couples worldwide. The scope and severity of the infertility problem is even more prevalent in developing countries, mostly due to untreated reproductive tract infections (RTIs). Infertility, however, goes beyond the mere inability to procreate, but brings about profound psychological, social, and ethical implications of enormous magnitude. In vitro fertilization (IVF) and other assisted reproduction technologies (ARTs) have gradually become widespread therapeutic options. After all, the implementation of medically assisted reproductive procedures in order to overcome infertility is in keeping with the tenets of the reproductive rights agenda laid out at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo in 1994. Nonetheless, concerns still linger about how to implement and regulate such interventions in an ethically tenable fashion. The unremitting pace at which such techniques develop have upset the very notion of sexuality relating to reproduction as well as the concept of family itself. That rift risks causing a crisis in terms of bioethics sustainability and enforcement, which is bound to happen when science and innovation outpace the bioethical precepts on which we rely for essential guidance in medical practice. The authors argue in favor of an approach to regulation and policy-making that puts on the forefront a thorough assessment as to potential risks that such interventions might entail for foundational bioethics principles and inalienable human rights.

Art innovations: Fostering women’s psychophysical health between bioethics precepts and human rights

Driul L.;
2021

Abstract

Infertility is a highly relevant global issue affecting the reproductive health of at least 15% of reproductive-aged couples worldwide. The scope and severity of the infertility problem is even more prevalent in developing countries, mostly due to untreated reproductive tract infections (RTIs). Infertility, however, goes beyond the mere inability to procreate, but brings about profound psychological, social, and ethical implications of enormous magnitude. In vitro fertilization (IVF) and other assisted reproduction technologies (ARTs) have gradually become widespread therapeutic options. After all, the implementation of medically assisted reproductive procedures in order to overcome infertility is in keeping with the tenets of the reproductive rights agenda laid out at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo in 1994. Nonetheless, concerns still linger about how to implement and regulate such interventions in an ethically tenable fashion. The unremitting pace at which such techniques develop have upset the very notion of sexuality relating to reproduction as well as the concept of family itself. That rift risks causing a crisis in terms of bioethics sustainability and enforcement, which is bound to happen when science and innovation outpace the bioethical precepts on which we rely for essential guidance in medical practice. The authors argue in favor of an approach to regulation and policy-making that puts on the forefront a thorough assessment as to potential risks that such interventions might entail for foundational bioethics principles and inalienable human rights.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/1215946
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