Background and objectives: Adolescence represents a critical period for rapid psychophysical and socio-cognitive changes, with implications for health and wellbeing in later life. From this perspective, the manifestation of unhealthy lifestyles and dysfunctional behaviors may reflect a change in wellbeing requiring alertness and prompt intervention. This study investigated lifestyle behaviors and coping strategies among Italian adolescents, also in relation to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and whether they would predict a change in subjective wellbeing. Materials and Methods: In the period between 1 April and 10 April 2020, adolescents aged 15–21 filled out an online survey consisting of 33 questions investigating socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle behaviors, coping strategies, and subjective wellbeing. Results: Data was available on 306 participants. Most adolescents planned their daily routine (57.8%), engaging in structured activities (17.6–67.3%) and developing new interests (54.6%), and gave a positive reading of the ongoing period (57.8%), thus revealing adaptive coping strategies. Family wise, even though it was hard to stay at home (66%) and difficulties emerged, including self-isolation (50.7%) and quarrels (31.7%), a relevant proportion of adolescents shared their feelings (40.5%) and revaluated their family relationships (29.4–39.7%). In terms of social and school engagement, almost all adolescents kept contacts with their partner, friends, and teachers (90.2–93.5%). School commitments at home were sufficiently preserved (63.1%), however adolescents expressed preoccupations about their educational path (56.2%). A change in subjective wellbeing (49.3%) and symptoms of anxiety (39.9%) were frequently reported. A number of factors predicted a change in subjective wellbeing, including adaptive coping strategies (physical activity, OR = 2.609, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.297–5.247; engaging in different activities than before, OR = 2.212, 95% CI 1.157–4.230), family issues (finding hard to stay at home, OR = 3.852, 95% CI 1.953–7.599; having quarrels, OR = 2.158, 95% CI 1.122–4.150), school-related behaviors (fearing a negative educational outcome, OR = 1.971, 95% 1.063–3.655), and female gender (OR = 3.647, 95% CI 1.694–7.851). Conclusions: Both personal and environmental coping resources are relevant to subjective wellbeing in adolescence and should be taken into account for prevention and early intervention in youth mental health.

Adolescent lifestyle behaviors, coping strategies and subjective wellbeing during the covid-19 pandemic: An online student survey

Colizzi M.
2020

Abstract

Background and objectives: Adolescence represents a critical period for rapid psychophysical and socio-cognitive changes, with implications for health and wellbeing in later life. From this perspective, the manifestation of unhealthy lifestyles and dysfunctional behaviors may reflect a change in wellbeing requiring alertness and prompt intervention. This study investigated lifestyle behaviors and coping strategies among Italian adolescents, also in relation to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and whether they would predict a change in subjective wellbeing. Materials and Methods: In the period between 1 April and 10 April 2020, adolescents aged 15–21 filled out an online survey consisting of 33 questions investigating socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle behaviors, coping strategies, and subjective wellbeing. Results: Data was available on 306 participants. Most adolescents planned their daily routine (57.8%), engaging in structured activities (17.6–67.3%) and developing new interests (54.6%), and gave a positive reading of the ongoing period (57.8%), thus revealing adaptive coping strategies. Family wise, even though it was hard to stay at home (66%) and difficulties emerged, including self-isolation (50.7%) and quarrels (31.7%), a relevant proportion of adolescents shared their feelings (40.5%) and revaluated their family relationships (29.4–39.7%). In terms of social and school engagement, almost all adolescents kept contacts with their partner, friends, and teachers (90.2–93.5%). School commitments at home were sufficiently preserved (63.1%), however adolescents expressed preoccupations about their educational path (56.2%). A change in subjective wellbeing (49.3%) and symptoms of anxiety (39.9%) were frequently reported. A number of factors predicted a change in subjective wellbeing, including adaptive coping strategies (physical activity, OR = 2.609, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.297–5.247; engaging in different activities than before, OR = 2.212, 95% CI 1.157–4.230), family issues (finding hard to stay at home, OR = 3.852, 95% CI 1.953–7.599; having quarrels, OR = 2.158, 95% CI 1.122–4.150), school-related behaviors (fearing a negative educational outcome, OR = 1.971, 95% 1.063–3.655), and female gender (OR = 3.647, 95% CI 1.694–7.851). Conclusions: Both personal and environmental coping resources are relevant to subjective wellbeing in adolescence and should be taken into account for prevention and early intervention in youth mental health.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/1218482
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