Objectives: Patients with Crohn's disease (CD) usually undergo magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) for evaluating small bowel involvement. Musculoskeletal symptoms are the most frequent extraintestinal manifestation in inflammatory bowel diseases, especially in CD, with sacroiliitis at imaging occurring in about 6–46% of patients and possibly correlating with axial spondyloarthritis. The primary study aim was to assess the prevalence of sacroiliitis in adult and pediatric patients with CD performing an MRE. We also evaluated the inter-rater agreement for MRE sacroiliitis and the association between sacroiliitis and patients' clinical data. Method: We retrospectively identified 100 adult and 30 pediatric patients diagnosed with CD who performed an MRE between December 2012 and May 2020 in three inflammatory bowel disease centers. Two radiologists assessed the prevalence of sacroiliitis at MRE. We evaluated the inter-rater agreement for sacroiliitis with Cohen's kappa and intraclass correlation coefficient statistics and assessed the correlation between sacroiliitis and demographic, clinical, and endoscopic data (Chi-square and Fisher's tests). Results: The prevalence of sacroiliitis at MRE was 20% in adults and 6.7% in pediatric patients. The inter-rater agreement for sacroiliitis was substantial (k = 0.62, p < 0.001) in the adults and moderate (k = 0.46, p = 0.011) in the pediatric cohort. Age ≥ 50 years and the time between CD diagnosis and MRE (≥ 86.5 months) were significantly associated with sacroiliitis in adult patients (p = 0.049 and p = 0.038, respectively). Conclusions: Sacroiliitis is a frequent and reliable abnormality at MRE in adult patients with CD, associated with the age of the patients ≥ 50 years and CD duration.

Asymptomatic sacroiliitis detected by magnetic resonance enterography in patients with Crohn's disease: prevalence, association with clinical data, and reliability among radiologists in a multicenter study of adult and pediatric population

Cereser L.;Zancan G.;Giovannini I.;Marino M.;Tullio A.;De Vita S.;Girometti R.;
2022

Abstract

Objectives: Patients with Crohn's disease (CD) usually undergo magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) for evaluating small bowel involvement. Musculoskeletal symptoms are the most frequent extraintestinal manifestation in inflammatory bowel diseases, especially in CD, with sacroiliitis at imaging occurring in about 6–46% of patients and possibly correlating with axial spondyloarthritis. The primary study aim was to assess the prevalence of sacroiliitis in adult and pediatric patients with CD performing an MRE. We also evaluated the inter-rater agreement for MRE sacroiliitis and the association between sacroiliitis and patients' clinical data. Method: We retrospectively identified 100 adult and 30 pediatric patients diagnosed with CD who performed an MRE between December 2012 and May 2020 in three inflammatory bowel disease centers. Two radiologists assessed the prevalence of sacroiliitis at MRE. We evaluated the inter-rater agreement for sacroiliitis with Cohen's kappa and intraclass correlation coefficient statistics and assessed the correlation between sacroiliitis and demographic, clinical, and endoscopic data (Chi-square and Fisher's tests). Results: The prevalence of sacroiliitis at MRE was 20% in adults and 6.7% in pediatric patients. The inter-rater agreement for sacroiliitis was substantial (k = 0.62, p < 0.001) in the adults and moderate (k = 0.46, p = 0.011) in the pediatric cohort. Age ≥ 50 years and the time between CD diagnosis and MRE (≥ 86.5 months) were significantly associated with sacroiliitis in adult patients (p = 0.049 and p = 0.038, respectively). Conclusions: Sacroiliitis is a frequent and reliable abnormality at MRE in adult patients with CD, associated with the age of the patients ≥ 50 years and CD duration.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/1224332
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