OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at exploring the perspectives and experiences of individuals with neck pain by synthesizing all available qualitative studies. METHODS: A systematic, qualitative meta-summary and meta-synthesis was conducted following the 5-step methodology proposed by Sandelowski and Barroso. A systematic search of 9 electronic databases was conducted in May 2021. Methodological quality was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. RESULTS: Nine studies were included in the meta-synthesis for a total of 103 participants (73 women). Eleven categories were identified as belonging to 3 main themes: physical ("My neck has gone wrong"); psychological ("I am worried about my recovery"); and social ("Pain limits my life"). In the physical theme, the categories with the highest frequency were symptoms (67%) followed by body perception (44%). The psychological theme frequencies from highest to lowest were psychological consequences (100%), coping strategies (100%), mindset (67%), expectations from health care professionals (44%), and gender influence (22%). In the social theme, frequencies from highest to lowest were social relationships (56%), work, and activities of daily living and physical activity (44%, respectively). CONCLUSION: An individual's experience with neck pain is a multidimensional phenomenon in which physical, psychological, and social dimensions influence each other. These findings suggested that health care professionals should be aware of recognizing and evaluating all of the individual's experiences to offer a truly patient-centered care pathway. IMPACT: This qualitative meta-synthesis responded to a call to action to explore perspectives and experiences of individuals with neck pain. These findings can provide crucial guidance for clinicians as they plan and implement evidence-based recommendations for neck pain.

Perceptions and Experiences of Individuals With Neck Pain: A Systematic Critical Review of Qualitative Studies With Meta-Summary and Meta-Synthesis

Alvisa Palese;
2022-01-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at exploring the perspectives and experiences of individuals with neck pain by synthesizing all available qualitative studies. METHODS: A systematic, qualitative meta-summary and meta-synthesis was conducted following the 5-step methodology proposed by Sandelowski and Barroso. A systematic search of 9 electronic databases was conducted in May 2021. Methodological quality was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. RESULTS: Nine studies were included in the meta-synthesis for a total of 103 participants (73 women). Eleven categories were identified as belonging to 3 main themes: physical ("My neck has gone wrong"); psychological ("I am worried about my recovery"); and social ("Pain limits my life"). In the physical theme, the categories with the highest frequency were symptoms (67%) followed by body perception (44%). The psychological theme frequencies from highest to lowest were psychological consequences (100%), coping strategies (100%), mindset (67%), expectations from health care professionals (44%), and gender influence (22%). In the social theme, frequencies from highest to lowest were social relationships (56%), work, and activities of daily living and physical activity (44%, respectively). CONCLUSION: An individual's experience with neck pain is a multidimensional phenomenon in which physical, psychological, and social dimensions influence each other. These findings suggested that health care professionals should be aware of recognizing and evaluating all of the individual's experiences to offer a truly patient-centered care pathway. IMPACT: This qualitative meta-synthesis responded to a call to action to explore perspectives and experiences of individuals with neck pain. These findings can provide crucial guidance for clinicians as they plan and implement evidence-based recommendations for neck pain.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11390/1232255
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