Study Objective: To evaluate the oncologic outcomes of patients with early-stage ovarian cancer (eOC) managed by laparoscopy or laparotomy in a single high-volume gynecologic cancer center. Design: Retrospective case-control study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting: Catholic University of the Sacred Hearth, Rome, Italy. Patients: Data of consecutive women with eOC undergoing comprehensive laparoscopic staging between 2007 and 2013 were matched with a cohort of patients undergoing open surgery between 2000 and 2011. Four-year survival outcomes were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Measurements and Results: Sixty women undergoing staging via laparoscopy were compared with a cohort of 120 patients undergoing open surgery. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Seventy percent of patients underwent adjuvant platinum based chemotherapy without differences between the 2 groups. Operative time (p = .01), estimated blood loss (p = .032), and median hospital stay (p = .001) were higher in patients submitted to laparotomic versus laparoscopic staging. As of October 2015, median duration of follow-up was 38 months (range, 24 -48), recurrent disease was documented in 16 patients (13.3%) in the laparotomic group and in 5 patients (8.3%) in the laparoscopic group (p = .651), without differences in the pattern of recurrence presentation. Four-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 89% and 92% in the laparoscopic group, respectively, and 81% and 91% in the laparotomic group, without any statistical significant difference between the groups (4-year PFS p = .651; 4-year OS p = .719). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggests that in the surgical treatment of FIGO stage I ovarian cancer, laparoscopy is associated with equivalent oncologic outcome compared with a conventional abdominal approach.

Laparoscopic Versus Laparotomic Surgical Staging for Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer: A Case-Control Study

Vizzielli G.;
2016-01-01

Abstract

Study Objective: To evaluate the oncologic outcomes of patients with early-stage ovarian cancer (eOC) managed by laparoscopy or laparotomy in a single high-volume gynecologic cancer center. Design: Retrospective case-control study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting: Catholic University of the Sacred Hearth, Rome, Italy. Patients: Data of consecutive women with eOC undergoing comprehensive laparoscopic staging between 2007 and 2013 were matched with a cohort of patients undergoing open surgery between 2000 and 2011. Four-year survival outcomes were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Measurements and Results: Sixty women undergoing staging via laparoscopy were compared with a cohort of 120 patients undergoing open surgery. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Seventy percent of patients underwent adjuvant platinum based chemotherapy without differences between the 2 groups. Operative time (p = .01), estimated blood loss (p = .032), and median hospital stay (p = .001) were higher in patients submitted to laparotomic versus laparoscopic staging. As of October 2015, median duration of follow-up was 38 months (range, 24 -48), recurrent disease was documented in 16 patients (13.3%) in the laparotomic group and in 5 patients (8.3%) in the laparoscopic group (p = .651), without differences in the pattern of recurrence presentation. Four-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 89% and 92% in the laparoscopic group, respectively, and 81% and 91% in the laparotomic group, without any statistical significant difference between the groups (4-year PFS p = .651; 4-year OS p = .719). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggests that in the surgical treatment of FIGO stage I ovarian cancer, laparoscopy is associated with equivalent oncologic outcome compared with a conventional abdominal approach.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11390/1242487
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