Overuse of mineral fertilizer has become common at the North China Plain. Simultaneously, more organic manure resources are available for smallholder farmers. In order to increase the use of organic manure and reduce mineral fertilizer applications, a 10-year fertilization experiment with maize took place between 2008 and 2017. We assessed the long-term effects of cattle manure (CM) application and a complete nutrient substitution with mineral fertilizer (MF) at four application levels (3, 6, 9 and 12 t ha-1 CM) on yield, macronutrients (N, P and K) use efficiencies and soil conditions. Results showed that maize yields from CM and MF treatments differed across time and were significantly different in the first year of the experiment to no significant differences with increasing experimental time. In addition, increased MF levels did not result in increased maize yields; this response was different with CM applications. The highest 10-year maize average yield was 7.7 t ha-1 obtained with 9 t ha-1 of CM. Our results also showed that at the lowest application level (3 t ha-1 CM), the partial factor productivity (PFP) and the agronomic efficiency (AE) of all macronutrients were significantly higher with MF than with CM applications. Nevertheless, these differences narrowed with increased fertilizer input levels. The MF and CM recovery efficiency (RE) of N, P and K performed differently. Generally, MF exhibited significantly higher N-RE than CM treatments. CM treatments had significantly higher P-RE, but no K-RE differences were found between CM and MF. Soil available N, P and K significantly increased when fertilizer levels raised. MF treatments exhibited similar levels of soil available N, but lower soil available P and K compared with CM treatments.

Long-term effect of manure and mineral fertilizer application rate on maize yield and accumulated nutrients use efficiencies in north china plain

Alandia Robles G.;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Overuse of mineral fertilizer has become common at the North China Plain. Simultaneously, more organic manure resources are available for smallholder farmers. In order to increase the use of organic manure and reduce mineral fertilizer applications, a 10-year fertilization experiment with maize took place between 2008 and 2017. We assessed the long-term effects of cattle manure (CM) application and a complete nutrient substitution with mineral fertilizer (MF) at four application levels (3, 6, 9 and 12 t ha-1 CM) on yield, macronutrients (N, P and K) use efficiencies and soil conditions. Results showed that maize yields from CM and MF treatments differed across time and were significantly different in the first year of the experiment to no significant differences with increasing experimental time. In addition, increased MF levels did not result in increased maize yields; this response was different with CM applications. The highest 10-year maize average yield was 7.7 t ha-1 obtained with 9 t ha-1 of CM. Our results also showed that at the lowest application level (3 t ha-1 CM), the partial factor productivity (PFP) and the agronomic efficiency (AE) of all macronutrients were significantly higher with MF than with CM applications. Nevertheless, these differences narrowed with increased fertilizer input levels. The MF and CM recovery efficiency (RE) of N, P and K performed differently. Generally, MF exhibited significantly higher N-RE than CM treatments. CM treatments had significantly higher P-RE, but no K-RE differences were found between CM and MF. Soil available N, P and K significantly increased when fertilizer levels raised. MF treatments exhibited similar levels of soil available N, but lower soil available P and K compared with CM treatments.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11390/1248126
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