Purpose: To describe the occurrence of gastrointestinal (GI) complications, specifically diarrhoea and constipation, in artificially (enterally or parenterally) fed critically ill patients within their first seven-day stay in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Methods: Observational prospective study conducted from September 1st to October 30th, 2019 and from August 1st to October 30th, 2021, in an ICU of a 1000-bed third-level hospital. General characteristics, nutritional variables, and medications administered were recorded and analysed. This study was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT05473546). Results: In total, 100 critically ill patients were included. Diarrhoea was present in 44 patients (44.0%), while constipation occurred in 22 (22.0%) patients. Patients with diarrhoea were generally those admitted for respiratory failure, whereas patients without diarrhoea were mostly affected by neurological disorders (22.7% vs 25%, respectively; p = 0.002). Likewise, patients with constipation were primarily those admitted for trauma (36.4%). Trauma patients were almost 24 times more likely to be constipated than patients with respiratory failure (OR 23.99, CI 1.38–418.0) and patients receiving diuretics were over 16 times more likely to have diarrhoea than patients not receiving diuretics (OR 16.25, IC 1.89–139.86). Conclusion: GI complications of enteral nutrition represent still a very common issue in ICU. The main predictor of constipation was an admission for trauma whereas the main predictor of diarrhoea was the use of diuretics. Clinicians should consider and integrate these findings into more personalized nutritional and management protocols to avoid gastrointestinal complications.

Diarrhoea and constipation during artificial nutrition in intensive care unit: A prospective observational study

Mattiussi E.;Piani T.;Tullio A.;Vetrugno L.;Deana C.
;
Capolicchio L.;Del Pin M.;Gazziola P.;Veizi S.
2023-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the occurrence of gastrointestinal (GI) complications, specifically diarrhoea and constipation, in artificially (enterally or parenterally) fed critically ill patients within their first seven-day stay in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Methods: Observational prospective study conducted from September 1st to October 30th, 2019 and from August 1st to October 30th, 2021, in an ICU of a 1000-bed third-level hospital. General characteristics, nutritional variables, and medications administered were recorded and analysed. This study was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT05473546). Results: In total, 100 critically ill patients were included. Diarrhoea was present in 44 patients (44.0%), while constipation occurred in 22 (22.0%) patients. Patients with diarrhoea were generally those admitted for respiratory failure, whereas patients without diarrhoea were mostly affected by neurological disorders (22.7% vs 25%, respectively; p = 0.002). Likewise, patients with constipation were primarily those admitted for trauma (36.4%). Trauma patients were almost 24 times more likely to be constipated than patients with respiratory failure (OR 23.99, CI 1.38–418.0) and patients receiving diuretics were over 16 times more likely to have diarrhoea than patients not receiving diuretics (OR 16.25, IC 1.89–139.86). Conclusion: GI complications of enteral nutrition represent still a very common issue in ICU. The main predictor of constipation was an admission for trauma whereas the main predictor of diarrhoea was the use of diuretics. Clinicians should consider and integrate these findings into more personalized nutritional and management protocols to avoid gastrointestinal complications.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11390/1258550
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