Clinical record (CR) is a tool for recording details about the patient and the most commonly used source of information for detecting adverse events (AEs). Its completeness is an indicator of the quality of care provided and may provide clues for improving professional practice. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of AEs. The secondary aims were to determine the completeness of CRs and to examine the relationship between the two variables. We retrospectively reviewed randomly selected CRs of patients discharged from the Academic Hospital of Udine (Italy) in the departments of general surgery, internal medicine, and obstetrics between July and September 2020. Evaluation was performed using the Global Trigger Tool and a checklist to evaluate the completeness of CRs. The relationship between the occurrence of AEs and the completeness of CRs was analyzed using nonparametric tests. A binomial logistic regression analysis was also performed. We reviewed 291 CRs and identified 368 triggers and 56 AEs. Among them, 16.2% of hospitalizations were affected by at least one AE, with a higher percentage in general surgery. The most common AEs were surgical injuries (42.6%; 24) and care related (26.8%; 15). A significant positive correlation was found between the length of hospital stay and the number of AEs. The average completeness of CRs was 72.9% and was lower in general surgery. The decrease in CR completeness correlated with the increase in the total number of AEs (R = -0.14; P = .017), although this was not confirmed by regression analysis by individual departments. Our results seem to suggest that completeness of CRs may benefit patient safety, so ongoing education and involvement of health professionals are needed to maintain professional adherence to CRs.

Are adverse events related to the completeness of clinical records? Results from a retrospective records review using the Global Trigger Tool

Cautero P.;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Clinical record (CR) is a tool for recording details about the patient and the most commonly used source of information for detecting adverse events (AEs). Its completeness is an indicator of the quality of care provided and may provide clues for improving professional practice. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of AEs. The secondary aims were to determine the completeness of CRs and to examine the relationship between the two variables. We retrospectively reviewed randomly selected CRs of patients discharged from the Academic Hospital of Udine (Italy) in the departments of general surgery, internal medicine, and obstetrics between July and September 2020. Evaluation was performed using the Global Trigger Tool and a checklist to evaluate the completeness of CRs. The relationship between the occurrence of AEs and the completeness of CRs was analyzed using nonparametric tests. A binomial logistic regression analysis was also performed. We reviewed 291 CRs and identified 368 triggers and 56 AEs. Among them, 16.2% of hospitalizations were affected by at least one AE, with a higher percentage in general surgery. The most common AEs were surgical injuries (42.6%; 24) and care related (26.8%; 15). A significant positive correlation was found between the length of hospital stay and the number of AEs. The average completeness of CRs was 72.9% and was lower in general surgery. The decrease in CR completeness correlated with the increase in the total number of AEs (R = -0.14; P = .017), although this was not confirmed by regression analysis by individual departments. Our results seem to suggest that completeness of CRs may benefit patient safety, so ongoing education and involvement of health professionals are needed to maintain professional adherence to CRs.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11390/1267948
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