The FRTL-5 experiment was performed during the 10 day Italian Soyuz Mission "ENEIDE" (from April 15 to April 25, 2005) on the International Space Station. The main objectives were: 1) the validation of the FRTL5 cells as a biological system to evaluate space environment effects; 2) the investigation of the space environment-related pathophysiological mechanisms of cellular damage and/or behaviour; 3) to verify if fast-growing cells could be differently sensitive to space environment-related effects as compared to cells in physiological stand-by. Because of the limited available space in the dedicated facilities and the restrictive requirements imposed by ESA, RSA and NASA, and because no pre-qualified equipment existed, all of the equipment and the procedures have been subjected to structural failure test and to severe qualification tests. Results were: 1) all the qualification procedures and tests were successful 2) Overall cell number is lower in the cultures exposed to space environment as compared to the controls reproducing the temperature conditions during the ENEIDE mission; 3) This phenomenon is most likely related to a slower growth rate in proliferative state; 4) This slow growth rate is: a) reversible, as demonstrated by the results of the growth curves, the plating and cloning efficiencies measured on the samples once they have been returned to our laboratory in Udine; b) mostly related to space effects as indicated by additional control in a clinostat. More experiments of this kind are needed to verify and validate these data and to investigate the molecular mechanisms underling the phenomenon.

FRTL-5 experiment during ENEIDE mission

CURCIO, Francesco;
2007

Abstract

The FRTL-5 experiment was performed during the 10 day Italian Soyuz Mission "ENEIDE" (from April 15 to April 25, 2005) on the International Space Station. The main objectives were: 1) the validation of the FRTL5 cells as a biological system to evaluate space environment effects; 2) the investigation of the space environment-related pathophysiological mechanisms of cellular damage and/or behaviour; 3) to verify if fast-growing cells could be differently sensitive to space environment-related effects as compared to cells in physiological stand-by. Because of the limited available space in the dedicated facilities and the restrictive requirements imposed by ESA, RSA and NASA, and because no pre-qualified equipment existed, all of the equipment and the procedures have been subjected to structural failure test and to severe qualification tests. Results were: 1) all the qualification procedures and tests were successful 2) Overall cell number is lower in the cultures exposed to space environment as compared to the controls reproducing the temperature conditions during the ENEIDE mission; 3) This phenomenon is most likely related to a slower growth rate in proliferative state; 4) This slow growth rate is: a) reversible, as demonstrated by the results of the growth curves, the plating and cloning efficiencies measured on the samples once they have been returned to our laboratory in Udine; b) mostly related to space effects as indicated by additional control in a clinostat. More experiments of this kind are needed to verify and validate these data and to investigate the molecular mechanisms underling the phenomenon.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/857768
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