Post-translational modifications (PTMs) strongly influence the structure and function of proteins. Lysine side chain acetylation is one of the most widespread PTMs, and it plays a major role in several physiological and pathological mechanisms. Protein acetylation may be detected by mass spectrometry (MS), but the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is a useful and cheaper option. Here, we explored the feasibility of generating mAbs against single or multiple acetylations within the context of a specific sequence. As a model, we used the unstructured N-terminal domain of APE1, which is acetylated on Lys27, Lys31, Lys32 and Lys35. As immunogen, we used a peptide mixture containing all combinations of single or multi-acetylated variants encompassing the 24–39 protein region. Targeted screening of the resulting clones yielded mAbs that bind with high affinity to only the acetylated APE1 peptides and the acetylated protein. No binding was seen with the non-acetylated variant or unrelated acetylated peptides and proteins, suggesting a high specificity for the APE1 acetylated molecules. MAbs could not finely discriminate between the differently acetylated variants; however, they specifically bound the acetylated protein in mammalian cell extracts and in intact cells and tissue slices from both breast cancers and from a patient affected by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. The data suggest that our approach is a rapid and cost-effective method to generate mAbs against specific proteins modified by multiple acetylations or other PTMs

Monoclonal antibodies against pools of mono- and polyacetylated peptides selectively recognize acetylated lysines within the context of the original antigen

CARAGNANO, Angela;BELTRAMI, Antonio Paolo;Antoniali, Giulia;TELL, Gianluca;
2016

Abstract

Post-translational modifications (PTMs) strongly influence the structure and function of proteins. Lysine side chain acetylation is one of the most widespread PTMs, and it plays a major role in several physiological and pathological mechanisms. Protein acetylation may be detected by mass spectrometry (MS), but the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is a useful and cheaper option. Here, we explored the feasibility of generating mAbs against single or multiple acetylations within the context of a specific sequence. As a model, we used the unstructured N-terminal domain of APE1, which is acetylated on Lys27, Lys31, Lys32 and Lys35. As immunogen, we used a peptide mixture containing all combinations of single or multi-acetylated variants encompassing the 24–39 protein region. Targeted screening of the resulting clones yielded mAbs that bind with high affinity to only the acetylated APE1 peptides and the acetylated protein. No binding was seen with the non-acetylated variant or unrelated acetylated peptides and proteins, suggesting a high specificity for the APE1 acetylated molecules. MAbs could not finely discriminate between the differently acetylated variants; however, they specifically bound the acetylated protein in mammalian cell extracts and in intact cells and tissue slices from both breast cancers and from a patient affected by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. The data suggest that our approach is a rapid and cost-effective method to generate mAbs against specific proteins modified by multiple acetylations or other PTMs
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/1105013
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