Increasing concerns have been raised on the health-related risks connected with energy drink (ED) consumption in children and adolescents, with high acute or chronic consumers exceeding 10% in either age group in Europe in 2011. Preliminary evidence has suggested a common pattern of ED and substance use, especially alcohol. Additional evidence has been accumulating very fast; in addition, other lifestyle and risky behaviors may contribute to shed light on the complex interplay of factors involved in ED consumption. We have undertaken a comprehensive systematic review of the evidence on psychosocial correlates of ED consumption in 0-18 years subjects, as published up to April 1, 2021, in MEDLINE/PubMed, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Reviews and Central Register of Controlled Trials, which allowed to select 104 original articles. Only ~ 10% of the papers provided results based on longitudinal analyses. A common pattern of ED consumption and polysubstance use, including alcohol, tobacco, and soft and hard drugs, was still confirmed in adolescents; violent and risky behaviors were also related to a higher ED consumption. In addition, frequent ED consumers are more likely to have bad dietary habits, including consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and junk foods. A generally inconclusive evidence was found for sport/physical activities, although sedentary behaviors were generally related to ED consumption.Conclusions: Frequent ED consumption might be a screening indicator to identify students at risk of substance use or other risky/problem behaviors; enquiring about an adolescent's recent ED consumption could create opportunities for early intervention/prevention by informed pediatricians. What is Known: • Substances, especially alcohol, are associated with energy drinks in most cross-sectional studies. What is New: • Violent behaviors are associated with energy drink consumption, in the absence of longitudinal studies; problematic use of internet/videogames deserves further investigation; unhealthy dietary patterns are related to energy drinks; evidence on physical activity is inconclusive, but sedentary behaviors are related to energy drinks.

Risky behaviors, substance use, and other lifestyle correlates of energy drink consumption in children and adolescents: a systematic review

Michela Marinoni;Maria Parpinel;
2022

Abstract

Increasing concerns have been raised on the health-related risks connected with energy drink (ED) consumption in children and adolescents, with high acute or chronic consumers exceeding 10% in either age group in Europe in 2011. Preliminary evidence has suggested a common pattern of ED and substance use, especially alcohol. Additional evidence has been accumulating very fast; in addition, other lifestyle and risky behaviors may contribute to shed light on the complex interplay of factors involved in ED consumption. We have undertaken a comprehensive systematic review of the evidence on psychosocial correlates of ED consumption in 0-18 years subjects, as published up to April 1, 2021, in MEDLINE/PubMed, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Reviews and Central Register of Controlled Trials, which allowed to select 104 original articles. Only ~ 10% of the papers provided results based on longitudinal analyses. A common pattern of ED consumption and polysubstance use, including alcohol, tobacco, and soft and hard drugs, was still confirmed in adolescents; violent and risky behaviors were also related to a higher ED consumption. In addition, frequent ED consumers are more likely to have bad dietary habits, including consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and junk foods. A generally inconclusive evidence was found for sport/physical activities, although sedentary behaviors were generally related to ED consumption.Conclusions: Frequent ED consumption might be a screening indicator to identify students at risk of substance use or other risky/problem behaviors; enquiring about an adolescent's recent ED consumption could create opportunities for early intervention/prevention by informed pediatricians. What is Known: • Substances, especially alcohol, are associated with energy drinks in most cross-sectional studies. What is New: • Violent behaviors are associated with energy drink consumption, in the absence of longitudinal studies; problematic use of internet/videogames deserves further investigation; unhealthy dietary patterns are related to energy drinks; evidence on physical activity is inconclusive, but sedentary behaviors are related to energy drinks.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11390/1217470
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact