Water Distribution Network Partitioning (WDNP), which is the partitioning of the existing Water distribution Network (WDN) into smaller and more homogeneous portions called District Metered Areas (DMAs), is an effective strategy that allows water utilities to improve network management through water balance, pressure control, water loss detection, and protection from contamination. The partitioning is realized physically, closing the pipes between two different districts, or virtually, installing flow meters which measure the districts inflow and outflow. Pipe closures lead to a considerable network performance worsening, reducing minimum pressure, resilience, and redundancy; on the other hand, flow meters allow us to avoid these issues but involve a higher investing cost. Hence, the DMAs’ definition could become a hard task because both network performance and maximum investing cost must be respected. This paper presents the application of an optimization approach, based on complex network theory, coupled with an optimization technique based on genetic algorithms (GA). The methodology, implemented in Python environment, consists of a clustering phase carried out with two different algorithms (Girvan–Newman and spectral clustering) and a dividing phase which defines whether a gate valve or a flow meter should be installed in a pipe. The last phase is fulfilled with the GA which allows us to optimize one or more objectives in order to minimize the cost and maximize the network performance. The methodology has been applied on the Udine water distribution system, whose hydraulic model has been calibrated with a recent measure campaign. The results produced with the different clustering algorithms and objective functions have been compared to show their pros and cons.

Water distribution Network Partitioning based on complex network theory: the Udine case study

Federico Spizzo
Primo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Daniele Goi
Ultimo
Supervision
;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Water Distribution Network Partitioning (WDNP), which is the partitioning of the existing Water distribution Network (WDN) into smaller and more homogeneous portions called District Metered Areas (DMAs), is an effective strategy that allows water utilities to improve network management through water balance, pressure control, water loss detection, and protection from contamination. The partitioning is realized physically, closing the pipes between two different districts, or virtually, installing flow meters which measure the districts inflow and outflow. Pipe closures lead to a considerable network performance worsening, reducing minimum pressure, resilience, and redundancy; on the other hand, flow meters allow us to avoid these issues but involve a higher investing cost. Hence, the DMAs’ definition could become a hard task because both network performance and maximum investing cost must be respected. This paper presents the application of an optimization approach, based on complex network theory, coupled with an optimization technique based on genetic algorithms (GA). The methodology, implemented in Python environment, consists of a clustering phase carried out with two different algorithms (Girvan–Newman and spectral clustering) and a dividing phase which defines whether a gate valve or a flow meter should be installed in a pipe. The last phase is fulfilled with the GA which allows us to optimize one or more objectives in order to minimize the cost and maximize the network performance. The methodology has been applied on the Udine water distribution system, whose hydraulic model has been calibrated with a recent measure campaign. The results produced with the different clustering algorithms and objective functions have been compared to show their pros and cons.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11390/1246244
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