Multisensory integration is quintessential to adaptive behavior, with clinical populations showing significant impairments in this domain, most notably hallucinatory reports. Interestingly, altered cross-modal interactions have also been reported in healthy individuals when engaged in tasks such as the Sound-Induced Flash-Illusion (SIFI). The temporal dynamics of the SIFI have been recently tied to the speed of occipital alpha rhythms (IAF), with faster oscillations entailing reduced temporal windows within which the illusion is experienced. In this regard, entrainment-based protocols have not yet implemented rhythmic transcranial magnetic stimulation (rhTMS) to causally test for this relationship. It thus remains to be evaluated whether rhTMS-induced acoustic and somatosensory sensations may not specifically interfere with the illusion. Here, we addressed this issue by asking 27 volunteers to perform a SIFI paradigm under different Sham and active rhTMS protocols, delivered over the occipital pole at the IAF. Although TMS has been proven to act upon brain tissues excitability, results show that the SIFI occurred for both Sham and active rhTMS, with the illusory rate not being significantly different between baseline and stimulation conditions. This aligns with the discrete sampling hypothesis, for which alpha amplitude modulation, known to reflect changes in cortical excitability, should not account for changes in the illusory rate. Moreover, these findings highlight the viability of rhTMS-based interventions as a means to probe the neuroelectric signatures of illusory and hallucinatory audiovisual experiences, in healthy and neuropsychiatric populations.

Rhythmic TMS as a Feasible Tool to Uncover the Oscillatory Signatures of Audiovisual Integration

Ippolito G.;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Multisensory integration is quintessential to adaptive behavior, with clinical populations showing significant impairments in this domain, most notably hallucinatory reports. Interestingly, altered cross-modal interactions have also been reported in healthy individuals when engaged in tasks such as the Sound-Induced Flash-Illusion (SIFI). The temporal dynamics of the SIFI have been recently tied to the speed of occipital alpha rhythms (IAF), with faster oscillations entailing reduced temporal windows within which the illusion is experienced. In this regard, entrainment-based protocols have not yet implemented rhythmic transcranial magnetic stimulation (rhTMS) to causally test for this relationship. It thus remains to be evaluated whether rhTMS-induced acoustic and somatosensory sensations may not specifically interfere with the illusion. Here, we addressed this issue by asking 27 volunteers to perform a SIFI paradigm under different Sham and active rhTMS protocols, delivered over the occipital pole at the IAF. Although TMS has been proven to act upon brain tissues excitability, results show that the SIFI occurred for both Sham and active rhTMS, with the illusory rate not being significantly different between baseline and stimulation conditions. This aligns with the discrete sampling hypothesis, for which alpha amplitude modulation, known to reflect changes in cortical excitability, should not account for changes in the illusory rate. Moreover, these findings highlight the viability of rhTMS-based interventions as a means to probe the neuroelectric signatures of illusory and hallucinatory audiovisual experiences, in healthy and neuropsychiatric populations.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
biomedicines-11-01746-v2.pdf

accesso aperto

Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 2.35 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.35 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11390/1255904
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact